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Child Support Archives

Ensuring your children receive fair child support after divorce

If you are divorcing and valuable assets are part of your divorce, you already understand how complicated the issues can be. These assets affect child support, with the amount of payments determined in part by the income of both parents. Adding to the issue is the standard of living your children have enjoyed throughout their lives. It is probably fair to say that they deserve to continue enjoying their current standard of living.

Proving contempt: Getting the child support you deserve

You deserve the child support that a court awarded to you, and if that child support isn't being paid, you don't need to sit back and wait for it indefinitely. Having to wait for this support may not affect you financially, but that's no reason not to seek it out. The support is meant to help your child get the things he or she needs, whether or not that money is necessary in his or her daily life. It's up to you to make sure the child support money goes toward your child's needs.

How to get your child support payments modified

If you need to have your child support payments modified, you typically can by following a child support modification process through the courts or by making an agreement with your ex-spouse. If you can't support the amount of money you're expected to pay, it's important to act quickly to get your modification set into action; if you don't, you could start owing back child support, which can be expensive.

Support your child with appropriate child support payments

When you think of child support, what do you imagine it is for? If you see the money going toward your child's home, health and happiness, then you understand the very basis of what this money is meant to be used for. During a divorce, determining child support and how much one person should receive or owe can be contentious, but when all is said and done, this money is for the continued welfare of your children.

How do you know if you've gotten all your child support?

As a parent with primary custody of your child in Massachusetts, it's important to make sure that you're getting the child support you need and deserve. Child support is awarded so you can give your child everything he or she needs despite not having both parents in the home. If you're not receiving it, then the other parent is committing a crime.

How does Massachusetts implement administrative enforcement?

In Massachusetts, those who don't pay their child support can be forced to do so through administrative enforcement. The Child Support Enforcement Division is responsible for collecting and enforcing child support and does so through a fully automated program. That means that anyone who is overdue in paying child support may be subject to the administrative collection actions.

Why child support guidelines are used in Massachusetts

Child support guidelines may make you feel uncomfortable during a divorce or child custody case, but they are there for good reason. While you may think some guidelines are too lenient or not lenient enough, these guidelines are there to protect your child from excessive stress and anxiety along with making sure the primary custodian has the money needed to support the child in question.

You have the right to child support in Massachusetts

Child support is not something that you and a spouse should have to fight over after a divorce or break up; it's meant to go to your children, the children you raised and intended on supporting until their adult lives. Although this is the case, sometimes you and the other parent may disagree on how much child support is needed or where it should be spent. If you've never been married, then someone may not feel obligated to pay, even though this isn't true by law.

Defining your right to child support in Massachusetts

As a parent of a child in Massachusetts, you typically have some rights to child support from the other parent. You do need to be entitled to those payments, though. If you can answer these questions with "yes," then you likely are eligible to receive child support.

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